Conference / Seminar, Financial Reporting and Analysis, Virtual Events & Programming

Spotting Financial Shenanigans in Corporate Filings

Monday, April 19 | 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

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Overview

Do those quarterly reports look just too good to be true? Sometimes, larger-than-life updates can seem like a great opportunity … until reality sets in. Join CFA Society New York’s Financial Reporting and Analysis interest group for a complete crash course in spotting weak and deteriorating companies that may be using a variety of accounting gimmicks or other inventive tactics to hide their problems from investors. 

Learn how to avoid giving companies the benefit of the doubt when assessing reported information. This seminar will cover a few key areas in which shrewd observers are likely to encounter inconsistencies: some general “breeding grounds” for troubled conditions, earnings manipulation, cash flow, key metrics, and acquisition-accounting details. 

Agenda

5:30 PM | OPENING REMARKS

Arthur Fliegelman, CFA, Chair of the Financial Reporting & Analysis Group, CFA Society New York


5:35 PM | KEYNOTE PRESENTATION

Howard Schilit, Ph. D., Founder, Chief Executive Officer, Schilit Forensics LLC


6:15 PM | Q&A


6:30 PM |  CLOSING REMARKS

Arthur Fliegelman, CFA, Chair of the Financial Reporting & Analysis Group, CFA Society New York

Additional Details

Learning Outcomes

  • Identify red flags in a company’s behavior 
  • Learn how changes in accounting principles or estimates can be willful steps to hide problems 
  • Avoid being misled by non-GAAP metrics 
  • Discover how pattern recognition can alert investors to subtle changes that indicate big problems