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[CFA Society Boston Webinar] Shared Caregiving: How Fathers May Hold the Key to Women’s Advancement

Monday, June 8 | 1:00 AM - 2:00 PM

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Overview

An important but sometimes overlooked issue in addressing the challenges women face in terms of career development and advancement is the role that men play in the family and on the homefront. While corporate efforts to support women through mentoring, job rotation, leadership training and accelerated development programs are important, the existence of a shared caregiving model at home is perhaps even more important when it comes to helping women advance.

Research conducted by the Boston College Center for Work & Family over the last decade on working fathers has shown the evolution of men’s attitudes and aspirations for a more equitable distribution of family responsibilities. At the same time however, men’s aspirations toward shared caregiving does not always reflect reality on the ground. In spite of fathers’ good intentions, mothers still do more than twice as much in terms of domestic tasks and caregiving. This fact may represent the greatest single obstacle to women’s advancement. This imbalance has often been referred to not as the glass ceiling, but rather the “maternal wall.”

Join us for a review of this research on today’s fathers and a discussion of how understanding this is important to women and men in both their professional and personal lives. Our presenter will be Professor Brad Harrington executive director of the Center for Work & Family and a research professor in the Carroll School of Management.

This event is complimentary and open to members and non-members. Registrants will receive dial-in information the Friday before the start of the event.

Additional Details

Learning Outcomes

  • How a shared caregiving model at home can help women advance in their careers
  • Review of research conducted by the Boston College Center for Work & Family over the last decade on working fathers
  • Mothers do more than twice as much in terms of domestic tasks and caregiving, an obstacle to women’s career advancement
  • Understanding how more equitable distribution of family responsibilities can impact women and men in both their professional and personal lives